Category: ISIS

When Japan met Daesh

After the recent executions of Japanese citizens, Kenji Goto and Haruna Yukawa at the hands of Daesh (also known as ISIS), there has been some diversity in response from Japanese society. Scott Musgrave, Alchohonaa’s East Asia Editor explains..

When names become important: ‘Daesh’ as a silencing of ISIS’s claim to be the Islamic State?

Professor Malory Nye argues that the debate about calling the terrorist outfit Islamic state (IS) non-Islamic is not justified because in Islam what is Islamic or not is far from a settled issue. In his view, this debate should be resolved if one calls IS ‘Daesh’- an Arabic word referring to ‘downtrodden’ (daes) or ‘causing discord’ (dahes).

Explaining Obama’s Foreign Policy: Don’t Bother

Does Obama have a coherent foreign policy? Does it matter? In this article Dr. Cooper identifies some basic principles of Obama’s foreign policy whilst dismissing simplistic categorizations such as realist or liberal. Whilst the seeming lack of consistency in Obama’s policies isn’t historically unusual, it does pose problems for predicting how America will respond to foreign policy challenges in the near future.

The Myth of the Sectarian Problem and the Solution in Iraq

Dr Simon Leitch analyses the current Iraqi crisis. As Iraq today is rocked by attacks from ISIS a blame game has started to undermine Nuri al-Maliki’s government. Maliki, so the argument goes, needs to do more for Sunnis or the country needs to be divided up along sectarian lines. Such a dichotomy is not helpful, as Maliki’s new democracy cannot be easily divided nor can Maliki give the Sunnis minority an equal say in the running of a Shia-dominated state.

How Iraq Became the Graveyard of the American Way of War

As debate continues over whether the Obama administration has done enough to prevent the rise of ISIS, it is worth thinking about the broader consequences of America’s war in Iraq. Dr. Danny Cooper, Alochonaa’s American Foreign Policy Editor argues that ‘one such consequence is a deep uncertainty about how the United States should employ its power’. in Danny’s view, the 2003 Iraq War, in fact, contributed greatly to undermining a number of ideas about how the United States should fight its wars in the twenty-first century.