Category: Politics

Is Beijing Considering a Policy Change in Xinjiang?

In this article, Brett Elmer argues that an escalation in Xinjiang and Uyghur-related violence since the October 31, 2013, car bomb attack in Tiananmen Square, Beijing, may finally have prompted Chinese President Xi Jinping to take steps towards rectifying the genuine Uyghur grievances that exist in the volatile region.

The Myth of the Sectarian Problem and the Solution in Iraq

Dr Simon Leitch analyses the current Iraqi crisis. As Iraq today is rocked by attacks from ISIS a blame game has started to undermine Nuri al-Maliki’s government. Maliki, so the argument goes, needs to do more for Sunnis or the country needs to be divided up along sectarian lines. Such a dichotomy is not helpful, as Maliki’s new democracy cannot be easily divided nor can Maliki give the Sunnis minority an equal say in the running of a Shia-dominated state.

New Zealand – A Unique Approach to Rights

Peter Ramage presents part 2 of ‘New Zealand A Social Laboratory of the World’. In part 2 of this series, Peter Ramage argues that although NZ was crowned the most socially progressive country earlier this year, there is an astonishing lack of executive checks and balances in place. The author explores how NZ civil rights and liberties are protected in a very unique and ‘Kiwi’ way, which for many commentators seems puzzling.

Takeaways from the Recent Flooding in the Balkans

In this article, B. Kal Munis explores both troubling and positive developments from the recent Balkan flood, an event largely ignored in Western media. In the aftermath of the disaster, inept government responses and media censorship have combined with local generosity and inter-ethnic cooperation, illustrating the problems and prospects for the future of the former Yugoslavian states.

An Examination of How Elite Interests are Reflected in the Media’s Coverage of Terrorism

Rudolf Ondrich argues that media reporting on terrorism, far from being unbiased and impartial, helps to propagate elite governmental interests. The result of this is media coverage that wildly distorts the actual factual record. In order to establish his point, Rudolf applies the propaganda model coined in by Edward Herman and Noam Chomesky on three case studies: (a) Israeli attack on Gaza Strip in 2009, (b) US backed genocide in Nicaragua in early 80s and (c) US-led war against Iraq in the aftermath of the 9/11.

Modi and the Illiberal India

Is the idea of a secular India merely a ‘chimera’? Alochonaa CEO discusses the reasons why Modi proved to be so successful in India’s election and probes whether or not Modi’s alleged role in the 2002 Gujrat riot will instil a culture of fear into India’s minorities?