Essays by Distinguished Scholars

 

jasonProfessor Jason Sharman is among world’s leading experts in International Relations (IR) and political science. He is the Deputy Director of the Centre of Governance and Public Policy at Griffith University in Queensland Australia. Sharman’s expert research has focussed on a range of issues, most notably those surrounding corruption, money laundering and tax havens, which culminated in his 2014 book Global Shell Games:Experiments in Transnational Relations, Crime, and Terrorism . His research articles were published in leading academic journals including International Organisation, Political Studies, American Journal of Political Science, Pacific Review and European Journal of International Relations. To read his essay G-20 in Brisbane: Are we Winning the War on Offshore Tax Evasion? click here

 

wernerWerner Menski, MA PhD is Emeritus Professor of South Asian Laws at SOAS, University of London, where he worked for 34 years after starting his academic career in Germany. He has written books and many articles on Hindu and Muslim law, and on South Asian laws, and has produced a much-used textbook on comparative law. See W. Menski (2006) Comparative law in a global context. The legal systems of Asia and Africa. Second ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. To read his essay : Bangladesh in 2015: Challenges of the “iccher ghuri” for learning to live together click here 

malory

Professor Malory Nye is the Editor, Culture and Religion: An Interdisciplinary Journal  and author of three books: Religion the Basics , Multiculturalism and Minority Religions in Britain: Krishna Consciousness and Religious Freedom and the Politics of Location and A Place for Our Gods: The Construction of an Edinburgh Hindu Temple Community. Presently, he is an independent academic, consultant and writer, affiliated with the Ronin Institute. He has a particular interest in multiculturalism, religion, diversity, and contemporary social issues. His website is at malorynye.com To read his essay When names become important: ‘Daesh’ as a silencing of ISIS’s claim to be the Islamic State? click here

 

 

 

riazProfessor Ali Riaz,  is the Chair, Department of Politics and Government, Illinois State University, USA. In 2013 he served as a Public Policy Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars at Washington, D.C. He testified at the US Congress on Bangladesh in 2013 and at the US Commission on International Religious Freedom in 2008. Alongside with his recent book “Islam and Identity Politics among British Bangladeshis: A Leap of Faith” (Manchester University Press), he has authored at least four books and appeared on CNN and Al Jazeera English TV channels. Dr. Riaz is one of the the world’s leading experts of South Asian politics. To read his essay  The Indo-Bangladesh Relationship: Can David Re-envision Goliath? click here 

halim-rane Associate Professor Halim Rane teaches Islam-West Relations at Griffith University, Australia and the Deputy Head (learning and teaching), School of Humanities. He is the  author of Making Australian Foreign Policy on Israel-Palestine: Media Coverage, Public Opinion and Interest Groups, and , Reconstructing Jihad amid Competing International Norms among others. To read his essay  Israel’s short-sighted targeting of Gaza click here 

 

 

rene wadlow Dr. René Wadlow is President and Representative to the United Nations, Geneva, Association of World Citizens. Formerly, he was professor and Director of Research of the Graduate Institute of Development Studies, University of Geneva, Switzerland. To read his essay Survival and Transformations: The Ongoing Struggle of Tribal Societies click here 

 

 

 

 

 

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