Can we speak in/with silence?

Maidul Islam argues that: “Most political theorists tend to focus on debates, rhetoric and public discourse but few analysed the issues by looking at silence. Silence is a phenomenon which is just as important as speech. In national politics, who is silenced by whom and how voluntary silence could be noticed in a particular juncture are important dimensions that shape public opinion.”

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Burkini bans in France: it’s all about intersectionality

Professor Malory Nye argues that Muslim clothing, always controversial in France, has become even more so due to the recent terrorist attacks from Muslims identifying with Islamic State. Understanding how something like a burka or burkini ban can take place, however, requires an understanding of how gender, patriarchy, religion and law interacts.

The Crisis of the Neoliberal Model of Higher Education: Part Two

In the final part of the two part commentary Jon Kofas argues: The education system is supposed to impart ideals and knowledge into a state’s citizens, however, the modern university system appears to be broken and incapable of serving its traditional role in society. This is partly because of a crisis in access opportunities, and partly because universities have become revenue driven. It did not have to be this way.

Religious and secular extremes in Pakistan, is moderation achievable?

Rizwan Mustafa reflects upon his 2015 PhD field work in Pakistan: after some recent discussions with Pakistani counter-terrorism officials, it became clear that they considered religion to be a primary cause of violent radicalism. Yet religion can act as a guide to moral virtue, so it is not obvious how the state can function without it. Can there be a middle ground between religious extremism and secularism?

The Crisis of the Neoliberal Model of Higher Education: Part One

In this first part of the two part commentary Jon Kofas argues: The education system is supposed to impart ideals and knowledge into a state’s citizens, however, the modern university system appears to be broken and incapable of serving its traditional role in society. This is partly because of a crisis in access opportunities, and partly because universities have become revenue driven. It did not have to be this way.

The Scope of Terrorism within the Parameters of Bengali Identity

In this piece, Shahariar Sadat–an advocate of the Supreme Court of Bangladesh argues that the nationhood of Bangladesh and the identity of its people are at a crisis point because of the recent spate of inexplicable violence. This exposition is an attempt to argue that Bangladesh is historically welcoming to foreigners and its population have always demonstrated exceptional religious tolerance.

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Good Bye and Thank You!

Alochonaa’s journey ends here and now!

The blog is not in operation anymore. We thank  all the editors, contributors, newspapers and media  who republished our content and helped us grow. We are proud of our achievement. What started as an experiment by few PhD students at Griffith University, Australia, turned out to be a source of reference for many academic articles and books.

Even though we are finishing our journey, we will still maintain the site for educational purpose.

Good Bye and Thank You!

 

 

 

 

 

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